Monday, August 6, 2012

Black Genocide: Shattering the Fatherless Black Child Myth

Shattering the Fatherless Black Child Myth

I keep hearing this stat thrown around 72% of black kids have no father. I thought it was awfully high, so I did some research. SURPRISE! It's a flat out lie. *sigh* To reach the stat, they have to count ALL divorced parents as not there, all widowed mothers and count Black men as women.

Ok you ready for this? 56% of Black men are heads of their household and fathers. This means they are married or divorced with custody of their children. The 72% stat counts the divorced Black men as if they were divorced Black women and say those children do not have a father.

Obviously, divorced parents have some sort of custody and visitation, and at one point they were even married. So saying these children are fatherless is a complete lie.

Obviously, widowed mothers had husbands and the children had a father. So, including these as fatherless is a lie.

Why do I say it's a lie? Because when people say 72% of Black children are FATHERLESS, they mean the children do not have a father at all and NEVER HAD ONE. They are trying to paint a picture to say that Black men do not and have not taken care of their kids. Yes, it's meant to degrade Black men.

Obviously a divorced father was and probably is in the child's life, so that doesn't fit the "never had one" stat.

Obviously a father that died was in the child's life, so that doesn't fit the "never had one" stat.

To blow your mind even further, 58% of Black women are or have been married [including widowed and divorced]. So you cannot have both a 72% fatherless and yet have a 58% married status.

To muddle the waters even more... TO REALLY SHOW YOU THE LIE... here are some stats that should be self explanatory. I apologize though, they are not broken down by gender. But, obviously you cannot have both fatherless Black children and these stats.


64%

Among households with a single-race black householder, the percentage that contained a family. There were 8.6 million black family households.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey <http://factfinder.census.gov>

44%

Among families with single-race black householders, the percentage that were married couples.
Source: 2009 American Community Survey <http://factfinder.census.gov>

41.8 million

As of July 1, 2009, the estimated population of black residents in the United States, including those of more than one race. They made up 13.6 percent of the total U.S. population. This figure represents an increase of more than a half-million residents from one year earlier.
Source: Population estimates <http://www.census.gov/popest/national/asrh/NC-EST2009-srh.html>

Conclusion

There is an all out attack on the Black family. There is no way that we came from a 70% marriage rate in 1960 to 22% 50 years later. I know a lot has happened, but not that much.

Everyone tries to point to the prison population. And, I hate to sound mean but, I looked into that as well. Only 800,000 Black men are in prison. Out of 41.8 million Black people, 800k is not that much. It does not amount to a 50% reduction in marriage rates.

The next time you hear someone say 72% of Black children are born fatherless. Go out of your way to correct them, and point them to this article.

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1 comment:

laBiscuitnapper said...

Thanks for writing this. I've been seeing the 72% statistic bounced around a lot but with no source or analysis. I did find some interesting reports on the involvement of separated black fathers which also counters stereotypes. The funny thing is, in a recent discussion on the shootings at Ferguson, the whole thing about broken black families came up as though somehow, racism happens because white people are concerned about broken black families? I don't even know. It is interesting how any attempt at discussing racism or institutionalized prejudice is pretty much instantly derailed with with claims about broken black homes. Quite bizarre, really.

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